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Surgical Conditions

  • One of the more common uroliths in the dog is composed of calcium oxalate crystals. Current research indicates that urine high in calcium, citrates, or oxalates and is acidic predisposes a pet to developing calcium oxalate urinary crystals and stones. The most common signs that a dog has bladder stones are hematuria and dysuria. The only way to be sure that a bladder stone is made of calcium oxalate is to have the stone analyzed at a veterinary referral laboratory. Unfortunately, calcium oxalate stones have a somewhat high rate of recurrence, despite careful attention to diet and lifestyle.

  • The general instructions for incision care are the same for all surgical incisions. There may be some differences, however, depending on the type of surgery and the material used to close the incision. This handout is a guide to caring for your cat's surgical incision(s) at home for optimal recovery.

  • The general instructions for incision care are the same for all surgical incisions. There may be some differences, however, depending on the type of surgery and the material used to close the incision. This handout is a guide to caring for your cat's surgical incision(s) at home for optimal recovery.

  • Neutering in Dogs

    La castración se ha de plantear siempre si va a mantener a su perro únicamente como mascota. Hay que tener en cuenta que los perros guía y los perros para sordos o minusválidos se castran de forma rutinaria. Es una intervención que tiene muchas ventajas y pocos inconvenientes.

  • A cataract is an increase in the opacity of the lens of the eye. There are many potential causes of cataracts because any type of damage to the lens can lead to a cataract. The clinical signs of cataracts vary significantly, depending on the size of the cataract; many cataracts are asymptomatic at the time they are diagnosed during a veterinary exam. The ideal treatment for cataracts is surgery, but not all cats are candidates for surgical treatment. In these cases, anti-inflammatory medications may be used to prevent glaucoma and other secondary complications of cataracts.

  • Cervical stenosis is caused by compression of the spinal cord, usually at the base of the neck. Although the spinal cord compression occurs in the neck, the hind legs are often affected first. In severe cases, the dog may suddenly develop total paralysis of all four limbs. The condition is most prevalent in Great Danes and Doberman Pinschers. It is diagnosed by myelography, CT scans, or MRI. Anti-inflammatory drugs and analgesics may relieve the initial discomfort, but the greatest chance of success lies with surgery. Most pets enjoy a relatively normal lifestyle following surgery.

  • A cesarean section is a surgery to remove kittens from the uterus and is most commonly performed as an emergency procedure when there is difficulty with natural birth. During the immediate recovery period, the mother and kittens must be closely monitored and begin eating/nursing within a few hours. If you have any concerns about their health, you should immediately have your veterinarian examine the kittens and their mother.

  • A chemodectoma is a type of tumor made up of chemoreceptor cells. Chemoreceptor cells detect chemical changes in the body and respond by regulating chemical or physical processes. These tumors are most often seen along one of the carotid arteries and the aorta. Brachycephalic breeds are more predisposed to these types of tumors, though they may occur in any dog breed. These tumors are usually locally aggressive, however, there are rare cases of metastasis to other organs, including the lungs, lymph nodes, and bone.

  • Cherry eye is a common name for a prolapsed third eyelid gland. The gland is mainly responsible for tear production in the eye, and treatment is recommended to prevent long-term damage. Treatment involves surgical replacement of the gland, though some dogs will have a recurrence of the problem.

  • Cholangitis/cholangiohepatitis in cats refers to inflammation of the bile duct or a combination of inflammation of the bile duct, gallbladder, and surrounding liver tissue. The clinical signs, diagnosis, treatments, and prognosis of the conditions are outlined in this handout.